Archive for the ‘Marion’ Category

Peter Wellington Alexander Papers

Friday, April 6th, 2012

Chapters


Introduction
Peter Wellington Alexander
Thomas C. Hindman

The Peter Wellington Alexander papers contain an array of documents related to the Civil War. Alexander was a correspondent for the Savannah Republican and other Southern publications during the war. His papers consists of letters, telegrams, business records, and newspapers related to Alexander’s career as a lawyer and journalist. After the Civil War Alexander began collecting official Confederate documents, at took a particular interest in the Trans-Mississippi Theater. Alexander acquired a significant collection of Major General Thomas C. Hindman’s papers. Hindman assumed command of the Trans-Mississippi District on May 31, 1862. His collection of papers includes order books, telegrams, correspondence, military reports, and other documents surrounding Hindman’s military service from 1862-1863.

Only a portion of Hindman’s papers have been digitized and made available through Community & Conflict. Researchers are encouraged to Contact the Rare Book and Manuscript Library at Columbia University to view the rest of the collection.

Collection Contributed by Rare Book & Manuscript Library at Columbia University in the City of New York

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Rebecca Stirman Davidson Family Papers

Friday, June 12th, 2009

Chapters


Introduction
Erasmus Stirman

The Stirman Davidson Collection is a spirited group of letters written to Rebecca Stirman Davidson, of Fayetteville, Arkansas. The bulk of the letters are from her brother Erasmus “Ras” Stirman, while serving in the Civil War. The letters tell the story of Erasmus service in the Confederate Army, his fears and doubts about winning the War, and leading his company of sharpshooters into certain death. Erasmus loved meeting new women, and his letters to Rebecca are full of candor and humor, often telling a larger tale of the social and cultural customs of the era to which he opportunistically flaunted. Erasmus’ successes in the military, coupled with his family’s access to political and societal privilege, combine to tell a wonderful story of upper class life in the Civil War of the Ozarks.

Contributed by the University of Arkansas Libraries Special Collections
Manuscript Collection MC 541

 

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